Lot #9

 

 

Lot# 9 is a visual reminder that my childhood was so much more than the four walls and ceiling that encompassed each room. For a period time it was the physical space my family occupied. Where they built an internal foundation of  unconditional love, guidance and support that was passed on to me and that I now have passed on to my family. I no longer feel saddened that the physical structure is gone. I realized that everything of importance I took with me.

Over the course of my life I will occupy many spaces. Each space I leave behind will becomes an intangible memory. And those memories, are the building blocks of my identity.

 

 

In search for inspiration I looked the work of two of my favorite visual artists, LaToya Ruby Baker and Carrie Mae Weems. Baker’s Notion of Family  speaks about her home life growing up in Braddock Pa and the physical toll living in that environment took on her mother and others in her community. Weem’s The Kitchen Table were staged scenarios that showed the intricate relationships within the  black family using personal props and centered around one main piece, a kitchen table.

 


NASTY WOMEN

I come from three generations of single mothers. Women with grace, patience and an abundance of love who dutifully took on the role of both mother and father. It is where I learned about patience,  humility ,forgiveness, unconditional love, and the power of prayer. I learned about loss and sadness,and how you don’t always have to be strong but you always need to be present.

 

As I stood there gripping the chain link fence a thousand memories flooded my mind and left me on an emotional roller coaster that lasted for weeks. It became clear that I had find a way to accept the existence of Lot#9 without feeling the loss of my identity and the existence of my childhood memories.

In search for inspiration I looked the work of two of my favorite visual artists, LaToya Ruby Baker and Carrie Mae Weems. Baker’s Notion of Family  speaks about her home life growing up in Braddock Pa and the physical toll living in that environment took on her mother and others in her community. Weem’s The Kitchen Table were staged scenarios that showed the intricate relationships within the  black family using personal props and centered around one main piece, a kitchen table.

Drawing on influences from both artist I created a memoir of 20 images from my early childhood. I decided to call this memoir Lot #9.

The 20 selected images consist of authentic photos, personal possessions and facsimile to recreate specific memories. To show the vividness of the memory they are recreated in color. Black and white images of family members were reshot in there original color and text was added to each image to provides a short narrative.

Lot#9 is a visual reminder that my childhood was so much more than the four walls and ceiling that encompassed each room. For a period time it was the physical space my family occupied. Where they built an internal foundation of  unconditional love,guidance and support that was passed on to me and that I now have passed on to my family. I no longer feel saddened that the physical structure is gone. I realized that everything of importance I took with me.

Over the course of my life I will occupy many spaces. Each space I leave behind will becomes an intangible memory. And those memories, are the building blocks of my identity.

asmp

American Society of Media  Photographers

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